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Johnson Collection of Japanese Prints

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Ando Hiroshige (aka Hiroshige), Japanese, (1797–1858)
Fifty-three Stations of the Tokaido: Station 42, Miya, c. 1833-1834
Ink on Paper
8 3/4 in. x 13 5/8 in. (222.25 mm x 346.08 mm)


Object Type: Print
Technique: Wood-block Printing
Creation Place: Asia, Japan
Credit Line: Gift of Mrs. James W. Johnson
Accession Number: 46.1.7


Marks
On mat in pencil: Johnson collection XIX 42, 10/94.

Medium
Nishiki-e, horizontal oban; colored ink on paper.

Object Description
Color woodblock print of an image of men holding ropes which are tied to running horses at a festival at the Atsuta Shrine.

Miya, the third largest station of Tokaido Road after Otsu and Fuchu, was also the town of the famous shrine of Atsuta, where one of the three treasures of the emperor, the sacred sword, is kept. Today miya is merged into the great city of Nagoya, but has remained as Atsuta ward, having taken the name of the shrine.
Among the festivals connected with this shrine was the Uma-oi (Chasing Horses) night festival. Bonfires light the night sky. In front of the torii gate, men dressed in bright costumes tie-dyed in red drive and chase two horses that appear to be galloping as fast as they can. But they do not run free-on each side, the men hold the lines of each horse's harness. Though the runners wield whips, if they make horses outrun them, they will fall and be dragged. And if this occurs, then the horse would slow down, dragging the men's weight. It seems that to have a successful chase, both horses and men had to cooperate.
(ref. “Hokusai and Hiroshige,” p.205 )

Publisher
Hoeido (Takenouchi Magohachi) seal.

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